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before civil rights. what we see is a switch to the entitlement state and the destruction of the black family. the removal of the black man. the government will give you your benefits and control them -- >> david, let me tell you this. you and i agree -- david, you and i gray on this point -- [overlapping dialogue] >> what are the numbers of children born to black families, two-parent families in the civil rights era? in the fight for civil rights, versus today from 80% to 83% in the opposite direction. that tells you something about liberalism. >> sean: we will be talking about it i am sure in the days to come. don't forget, "hannity" tomorrow night, following the debate in denver, live from the spin room, 11:00 p.m. and still to come, liz chain cheney -- liz cheney on what has been suspected on the benghazi attack on 9/11 was spontaneous or unexpected. ambassador stevens knew he was in danger. nothing was done by the obama white house. we will >> tonight, there is new informs on the ongoing coverup by the obama administration over the terror anac benghazi. the house oversight committ
secretary for civil rights in the u.s. department of education and is chairman of the u.s. equal opportunity commission from 1982 to 1990. he became a judge of the u.s. court of appeals in district of columbia circuit and 1990 and president bush nominated him as associate justice of the supreme court and he took his seat on october 203rd 1991. please welcome justice thomas and professor mark to the stage. [applause] >> thank you, ladies and tennant love for that extra nearly gracious, warm welcome. thank you for the national archives and the staff for making this event possible. thanks also, special thanks to the federalist society and the constitutional accountability center and thank you, justice thomas and off for being with us today as we mark the 225th birthday of our constitution. i guess i would like to start that conversation with the words the constitution starts with. we, the people. what that phrase means to you, how that freeze has changed over time thanks to the amendments and other developments. who is this we? when did folks like you when i become part of this? >> well, obviou
. contrast that with a judge that was blocked by the democrats on civil rights grounds because he was not on abortion. it has nothing to do with black people anymore. who was i talking about? host: charles pickering. guest: he was a prosecutor prosecuting the klan. he was putting his life at jeopardy and sent his kids to public schools. not white liberals. host: this is missy in buffalo. good morning. caller: i think you're brilliant. you are my role model. i just wanted to say that and i can wait to read your book. i know your book covers the 1970's and 1980's. the one topic they bring up with republicans is slavery. the republicans had a huge role in ending slavery, they still use that as a talking point against our party. guest: and the apocryphal southern strategy. that is the most amazing rewrite in history. in my third book, a large part of that was telling the truth of joe mccarthy. that covered about five years. liberals have reread the history to cover 200 years. republicans or the party to talk about slavery. it was for the next 100 years with platforms endorsing justice
, engaged the senators in discussion of how he felt about the issues, and it became clear he felt the civil rights act, a thomas just think, he thought there was no such thing as a right to privacy to the constitution, and the senate by a vote of 58-42 said to conservative and he was voted down. ronald reagan nominated instead to that seat anthony kennedy, who was serving a liberal but was certainly no robert bork either. and he has had a long and distinguished career as, now the swing vote on the court. and that really, that set, that really set up the rehnquist years. accord which i wrote about in my last book, "the nine," and when i started looking at the supreme court in a serious way as a writer, i was inspired by book that i'm sure is familiar to many of you called the brethren by scott armstrong and bob woodward, really a great book, first real behind the scenes book of the supreme court. and 15, the theme of the book was also justices, regardless of politics couldn't stand were in burger. they thought he was at pompous jerk. that sort of contention has been the rule more than the ex
it might keep people away from the polls. civil rights groups applauded the judge's decision. >> this is a victory today for the people and a loss for the scheming and lying legislators in harrisberg who thought they could hijack the presidential election. >>> the judge could still decide the law can go forward after the presidential election. >>> in other news this morning, american airlines and its pilots' us union back at the bargaining table this week after agreeing to reopen contract talks. pilots rejected american's last offer in august. nothey will seek an industry standard contract. >>> meanwhile, american says improperly installed clamps, caused rows of seats to come loose on three flights in the last week. the airline is inspecting its planes for similar problems. >>> two scenes of economic recovery this morning including a streak in new car sales. the car of sales and trucks, it rose 13% in the last month compared to a year ago. the last time sales figures were this good february of 2008. small, e ficars are fueling the sales trend. home prices are up 4.5% nationwi
the civil rights issue of our day is still the right for people to vote. the tactics to suppress may be less violent now but they are no less insidious. it is just a reminder this thing we call democracy takes work. re! miracle whip is tangy and sweet, not odd. [ man ] it's evil! if you'd try it, you'd know. she speaketh the truth! [ crowd gasps ] [ woman ] reverend? ♪ can i have some? ♪ >>> this is the end of a week of which the political world united. all were opposed to the menace one of our most beloved institutions, the nfl. roger goodell's lockout had gone three weeks into the season. replacements had been working the games to oftentimes an embarrassing effect. coaches, players and fans were furious with the blown calls and clamoring for the return of the real refs when monday night happened. the seattle seahawks last second prayer of a pass into the end zone landed in the hands of the green bay packers defensive back to somehow be ruled the winning touchdown for the seahawks. the uproar began. it was front page news. players and fans alike started contemplating protest and twitter
it's civil rights or women's rights for workers rights what people remember what unions were created in the first place. most of the world today has no recollection of why that happen. they don't know that god work 18 hours, you got paid a number that couldn't even let you live in a town in which you work. people don't understand what the database came from to the have to be an evolution and innovation within that movement. icy unions today, the smarter ones, doing all kinds of interesting things. to incorporate a fair work where they take their own money and great economic development. a lot of what i saw during the recession where banks warned lenin were taking their own pension conservation, their own investment managers and seeking out economic development opportunities. that's smart. that's look at how to get economic development activity, get my folks work. by do something to incentivize the economy. i think there's a lot of compelling unions that are innovating and thinking differently about it. i think to underestimate the the kind of political promise unions have today in am
that ron paul has history. what of his histories is the civil rights act of 1964. it valued the property rights of businesses. [inaudible] let's get to the issue of mitt romney. i'm not crazy about everything the president has done but being a businessman does not necessarily qualify you to run a country simply because the demands of a corporation are not the same as those of the nation. guest: one of the things that research has shown is that young people don't score differently on political knowledge questions. the people who are older than them, above 30, -- they may lack some experience but a great deal of young people who have other issues, people are concerned about jobs in the economy. when they have doubled the of employment rate, those people have a great deal of patience on issues in their voices should be heard in their communities and nationally because of that experience and because of our democracy. host: we're heading into the final weeks of the campaign. in the postgraduate realm, 57% are supporting barack obama. some colleges are evenly divided. jonesboro, arkansas, good
and having been in charlotte, a great civil-rights city, where the students from the historical black college in 1960 set up a lunch counter in to grant them and yet, what do we see today? state after state, efforts to suppress voting rights instead of expanding them. not enough people vote in this country. in pennsylvania, there is legislation now on the books that could disenfranchise between 750,000-1 million people. president obama won by 600,000 boats in pennsylvania last time. this really does determine the election. i don't care who you are for. this will determine the election. it is a huge problem or the country. we should be celebrating voters going to the polls, not putting impediments in their way. host: the radio program " democracy now" turns 25 this year? guest: we started in 1996. we were just on radio. the week of september 11, 2001, we started on the first television station in new york city on public access. then it just caught on like wildfire. beyond the election and more television stations aired us and radio stations and npr stations and pbs stations all over the countr
's civil rights, workers rights, or women's rights where people remember why unioners created. most of the world has no rex why it happened. you had to work 18 hours and never got overtime. you got paid a number you live in a town which you work. people don't understand where the value base came from. there is going to be an evolution or innovation in the movement. i see union doing all kinds of interesting thing. don't corporate affairs work they follow pension resources and they take their own money and create economic development. that's smart. looking how do i get economic activity get my folks. ensure my rate of return. do something to get the economy to move again. i think there's a lot of compelling unions that are think abouting it circhtly. to underestimate the kind of [inaudible] >> i would say one thing to watch political any in the jersey we come from a unionized state than a lot of states in the south. the union have different power and i think one of the things that is important to watch you saw it in wisconsin and you see in other places it's a growing system between
impact especially on civil rights cases. and i think it's entirely possible the court may limit or even overrule justice o'connor's opinion getting rid of racial preferences more and more. >> so this is a case involving a state university, a public university. so if they decide that affirmative action giving a preference to certain students based on race for example is unconstitutional, would it also automatically apply to private universities that get federal aid, for example? >> not automatically. but this is the way the court works is that they decide one case at a time. and they establish principles that are later applied or not applied. each case can be somewhat different. but if they say that a university which is a part of the state may not consider race, that race is simply impermissib impermissible, you can be sure that that message will filter out not just through universities but also to employers and to the government. it could be an enormous change. we'll only deal with public universities this term. >> let me read to you from your column you wrote on cnn.com. very provocat
of unique ways to get at the heart of what they care about. there is a whole history of whether it is civil rights or women's rights or workers' rights and people remember why it was needed to be created in the first place. they do not know they had to work 18 hours and overtime. you got paid a number and you cannot even live in the town where you worked. there is good have to be some kind of evolution and innovation in that movement. there are all kinds of interesting things in the corporate affairs works for the follow resources and create economic development. during the recession, banks were not lending. there were taking their own investment managers and seeking opportunities. that is smart. that is looking at, how can i get economic activity? how can i get a return? i think there is a lot of compelling union out there that are thinking differently about it. to underestimate the kind of political clout that unions have in america, it would not be smart. >> i would say one thing to watch as we go forward, politically, especially from new jersey and east, the unions have different powers
since before the civil war. >> all right. >> so it's their sample. >> do you as an investor, do you pay any mind at all to all these polls? >> yeah, sure, you have. to you've got to use every piece of information at your command. >> even though they're being jimmied and the democrat margins are being put up too high and it could create bad decisions. >> if you're an investor you're listening to everything including the show. the truth is gelling out. karl rove has a piece in the "wall street journal" today or yesterday making all the same points. sometimes i think my friends in the vast right wing conspiracy are grasping at straws by talk about things like this. but this is the kind of thing that allows you to gradually one little bit at a time counter act this relentless 24 by 7 drum beat for obama in the mainstream media. >> what about in trade? you have to pay to play. it's a word wide betting parlor or worldwide investment power. i've known them for years. obama is losing his lead but he's still got about two-thirds to one-third lead. it was three quarters to one quarter. how much s
to end the civil rights investigation. the board says african-american students receive an unfair majority of suspensions. the board has a plan in place to make sure students are treated equally. >>> a mother ran away leaving her daughter behind at the safeway to deal with police. the girl is staying with her grandmother. >>> nobel peace laureate ang sang su kyi will visit the area. she will speak at a sold out event tomorrow. we will have a look at the forecast and the morning commute when we come back. >>> welcome back. taking a live look at san francisco. i want to step out of the way so you see how foggy it is. that is the natural coolant off the pacific. we will soar into the weekend. a dangerous heat wave. if you work outdoors and you are caught off guard, you want to stay hydrated. it is not too bad right now. 61 in livermore. sunny finish for today. warmer than acknowledge conditions. heat wave sunday through tuesday. toward the end of next week, cooler weather arrives. we have to get through this, saturday through tuesday, triple digit heat. stay cool out there. let's che
voters. coach makes a good point. civilized debate is always the way to go. >> that's what we do every day. >> yeah, right. >> tom kierein is here with our forecast. hi, tom. >> good morning. there is the washington monument and jefferson memorial. so far they are dry. >>> just a few miles away, it's raining, and it's wet, and the pavement is wet. if you're coming in down through 70 or in from 66 this morning, all coming from a conveyor belt of rain associated with a front and an area of low pressure. right now closer to home, we're getting closer to moderate rain. right now raining pretty hard from right near burke, virginia, in western fairfax county through northern prince william from manassas to hay market, and then across northern fauquier county up through front royal. moderate rain in loudoun county, panhandle of west virginia too, and up toward hagerstown. this is going to be heading toward frederick in the next half hour. closer to washington, just a few sprinkles around the immediate metro area. some of those showers moving right into the western suburbs. just near 60 montgo
ability to protect people without invading civil liberties. and we're always, you know, working on that, what's the right balance there as well. so it is, it's a big job. >> will you stay in the administration if the president's reelected? >> i don't answer questions like that. >> if you weren't homeland security secretary, what job would you want? attorney general? >> again, i don't do what ifs. [laughter] >> what's your dream? >> my dream? you really -- i think i want to focus on this job. this job has every day is an adventure. so it has a lot of elements to it. >> okay. madam secretary, thanks very much. >> thank you. prison. [applause] >> thank you for that, madam secretary and shane, that was a great interview. my name is tim hartman, i want to welcome everybody today as one of the co-hosts of this event. we're going to move on shortly, but before we do, i just want to thank our underwriter for this event, for supporting it. our underwriter today exclusively is medapp, and we wouldn't be able to do events of this quality without the support of underwriters, so while we do some log
. >> paul steinhauser, good to see you. thanks so much from washington. >> thank you. >>> all right, as world leaders gather in new york, trying to figure out how to end syria's civil war, the numbers coming out of the country show the crisis is getting far worse. youtube video showing just how risky walking in syria's biggest sy of aleppo it be. 122 people have been killed so far today. the death toll since march, 2011, 30,000. that figure from a syrian human rights group. and now the united nations is releasing this figure. 700,000. that's the number of refugees predicted to flow into other countries. the u.n.'s refugee agency is asking for more than $480 million in aid. as ts is happing, u.s. defense secretary leon panetta said today that u.s. intelligence has detected syria moving chemical weapons at some sites for security reasons. a detail that could influence a decision about u.s. military intervention in syria. remember, this is what president obama said about chemical weapons in syria just last month. >> a red line for us is we start saying a whole bunch of chemical weapons
in it's approach, and we believe it's not the right way to do it. if you look at precedence using the civil aviation organization for consensus building on international aviation issues, is it much more effective way to do this. we have been clear both on p the record, off the record, and at every level with our e.u. counterparts that this is unacceptable, that we do not support it. if you look closely at the reaction around the world, you'll see that we have a lot of other nations in concert with the united states who also believe the unilateral imposition of that emissions trading scheme is inappropriate. finally, there appears to be some recognition on the european side of late that there are real consequences for doing this. we will continue to press for the appropriate avenues for the resolution of an issue like this. we are continuing to make it clear that we have serious concerns and do not believe it should be implemented, and i think the consequences of the european union moving ahead unilaterally are much butter under by the e.u. these days. >> thank you. >> mr. chairma
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)